AAACN 42nd Annual Conference 2017

123 - Built to Last: A Culture of Highly Engaged Telephone Triage Nurses

May 10, 2017 4:45pm ‐ May 10, 2017 5:45pm


Credits: None available.

Members: $15.00
Standard: $25.00

Description

Address engagement challenges for nurses working in telephone triage, both in centralized call centers and primary practice settings, with a primary focus on the leadership support of staff and patients.

Contact hours available until 5/14/19.

Requirements for Successful Completion:
Complete the learning activity in its entirety and complete the online CNE evaluation. You will be able to print your CNE certificate at any time after you complete the evaluation.

Disclosures:
No planning committee member or speaker declares any actual or potential conflict of interest.

Commercial Support and Sponsorship:
No commercial support or sponsorship declared.

Accreditation Statement:
This educational activity is jointly provided by Anthony J. Jannetti, Inc. (AJJ) and AAACN.

Anthony J. Jannetti, Inc. is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

AAACN is a provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider number CEP 5366.

Learning Outcome:
After completing this learning activity, the learner will be able to distinguish the differences between engaged and disengaged behaviors of staff within a telephone triage environment and discuss the benefits of building and maintaining an engaged environment for telephone triage staff.

Speaker(s):

Tags:

Credits Available


Built to Last: A Culture of Highly Engaged Telephone Triage Nurses Exam

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Martha Dong
8/7/17 6:56 pm

This was clearly directed at managers- the comments made were highly offensive to staff nurses as were the pictures of "our staff" being un-engaged. the "engagement" methods would not engage people with their job or their patients - they would weed out introverts and form connections between people who work there but not engagement with the job or the profession or the patients. they treated a question about follow up as "immediate gratification" and not a question from a staff nurse about professional improvement as it really was and gave a trivial example of how a nurse MIGHT find out results (days/weeks later). The faux joking manner of the male presenter was both offensive and inappropriate for a profession meeting.

Janice Gehrke
8/8/17 5:44 pm

I found this presentation filled with ideas and ways for me, as a staff development educator, to help RNs learn Epic Nurse Triage. It's so correct that the expert RN doesn't know how to triage without stepping back and embracing the learning needed. Key areas that I found fascinating include: the orientation period and curriculum to learn nurse triage, the integration with pharmacy and their workflows, and continuing care coordination (primarily post-hospitalization?). The presentation style of the speakers were light and entertaining, simply methods to keep a person's attention.

Kathleen Hause
8/22/17 4:07 pm

Excellent!

Kathleen Hause
8/22/17 4:09 pm

Wish my administrator was as open to new work environment options as you all are!

Kathleen Hause
8/22/17 4:10 pm

Great!

Catherine McFarlane
8/22/17 5:38 pm

Thank you for this energizing and inspiring presentation.